Diving into the Origins of the Dolphin Candlestick

Boston and Sandwich Glass Candlestick

Many people still use and love candles for their aroma and ambiance, but while some of us find it hard to believe, many others have never owned a candlestick. If we refer to candles at all, it's more likely candles in jars, tealight candles and even LED candles powered by batteries. Candlesticks are an easy, … Continue reading Diving into the Origins of the Dolphin Candlestick

Blue Glass – Azure to Cobalt Glassware of the Depression Era

Beautiful blue depression era glass came in every shade from deepest cobalt to transparent azure and it remains one of the most popular colors. Let's look at the glassware you can enjoy in your home. Hazel Atlas made deep cobalt blue glass in several depression patterns, notably Moderntone, Aurora, Royal Lace, Newport and New Century. … Continue reading Blue Glass – Azure to Cobalt Glassware of the Depression Era

How do we know a Pittsburgh Sideboard when we see one?

That’s a good question, isn’t it? I’ve stood in front of more than a few sideboards at antique shows and with Philadelphia on the tip of the tongue; someone blurts out “Pittsburgh.” It’s happened so often I feel I may know what a Pittsburgh sideboard is. Unlike eastern cities like Boston, Baltimore, Philadelphia and New … Continue reading How do we know a Pittsburgh Sideboard when we see one?

Real or Repro? A Primer on Depression Glass

Cherry Blossom is also one of the top 5 most collected Depression Glass patterns! The beautiful pattern is not only eye catching, but has a variety of pieces making it quite useful . It also can be found just about everywhere making it a little easier to collect than some patterns. This has also made it a target, as one of the most reproduced of all depression patterns. When I identify a reproduction (repro) in a person’s collection I always hear it can’t be as it was my grandmothers and she wouldn’t have reproductions. She had this set 50 years! Unfortunately, they were making repro’s back in the 1970’s, and some even earlier. If the collector was alive and possibly buying replacement pieces, it is quite possible many collections have reproductions in them. Trying to figure out if it’s real or a repro can be difficult with this pattern as there is not really a common thread to look for in the pieces.